How to make a guitar neck radius block

“How to make a guitar neck radius block” can easily be found by searching for it. However, we wanted to share our list of the top ten things you need to know when making a guitar neck radius block at home. This article explains how to make a guitar neck radius block. A guitar neck needs to be sanded in three stages: rough, fine, and extra fine. The wood should be cut from a piece of old furniture or other scrap wood with a fine grain and tight knots. Each sanding stage takes off about 0.005 inches of material from the surface that is being sanded. After the third sanding stage, the neck will be at a uniform thickness and have a uniform radius across its whole length. Sand in circular motions with an even pressure across the entire surface being sanded to avoid creating any peaks or valleys on the surface which could change the radius of the neck over time as it expands or contracts due to changes in humidity.

Related Article: How to clean guitar neck back

What is a guitar neck radius block?

A guitar neck radius block is a piece of wood that is precisely cut and used as a mold for sanding a guitar neck into a desired radius.

Why make your own radius block?

Crafting your own guitar neck radius block can be a fun project for beginners and experienced woodworkers alike. If you’re looking to create something for your guitar, you have two options: buy one or make one yourself. You may be tempted to purchase a radius block from a music store or online, but the craft of making your own is rewarding for many reasons.

1. The cost of purchasing a radius block is typically around $20-$30, which is the price of the materials needed to make one at home.

2. By making your own, you’ll know where all of the wood used in its construction came from and how it was cut.

3. You’ll also be able to customize it with any type of wood stain or finish that you desire to match with your guitar’s design.

How to make a guitar neck radius block

If you have a guitar that needs a new neck, you can make your own radius block out of scrap wood.

1. A guitar neck needs to be sanded in three stages: rough, fine, and extra fine.

2. The wood should be cut from a piece of old furniture or other scrap wood with a fine grain and tight knots.

See also  How Low Should Speakers Go?

3. Each sanding stage takes off about 0.005 inches of material from the surface that is being sanded.

4. After the third sanding stage, the neck will be at a uniform thickness and have a uniform radius across its whole length.

5. Sand in circular motions with an even pressure across the entire surface being sanded to avoid creating any peaks or valleys on the surface which could change the radius of the neck over time as it expands or contracts due to changes in humidity or temperature fluctuations.

The wood should be cut from a piece of old furniture or other scrap wood with a fine grain and tight knots.

Wood should always be cut from either an old piece of furniture or other scrap wood that has grain that is tight and knots that are all the same size. If you use an uneven piece of wood, it will cause problems in the sanding process because there will be too many variations in how tightly the surface absorbs your sandpaper. It should also be noted that any knots in the wood can create holes in your neck block which can lead to difficulties when finishing the neck.

 Always wear a mask when sanding because it’s not healthy for you to breathe in all of the dust created by sanding – especially if you’re doing this project outside.

You may want to invest in a vacuum cleaner hose attachment for your shop vac because it’s easier to remove dust particles using one than it is with just using your hand like most people do (and then get annoyed when they later cough up dust particles).

You’ll need some gloves to protect yourself while sanding, even if you’re wearing a mask, because hands are exposed directly to the dust created by sanding which means there’s no filter like there is on your mouth and nose.

When you’re done with the third round of sanding, make sure you wash off all of the dust so it doesn’t clog up your pores and create skin irritation over time since

Sorting the grain of the wood

One of the most important things to do before you start building your block is sorting the grain. You want to avoid using any pieces that have a major run in the grain along the neck, because this will create an unwanted ridge in your finished product. To identify which direction the grain runs, cut off a section of wood at a 45-degree angle and lay it down on its side. The direction of the grain should be easy to see when you look down at it.

See also  How to trade in at guitar center

Cutting the wooden board

Cutting the wooden board is the first step to making a guitar neck radius block.

1. Use a miter saw to cut the board to size, according to the measurements of the neck on your guitar.

2. Be sure to use a table saw with an edge guide to ensure that your angle is accurate, and that you are cutting at exactly 45 degrees.

Preparing the sandpaper

The sandpaper should be the finest grade available and it should be slightly damp (not soaking wet).

1. Cut five pieces of sandpaper to the same size as the guitar neck radius block, then cut a tab into each side making sure there is at least one inch on either end of the tab.

2. Fold this tab in half and glue it onto the back side of the sandpaper (this will make to tabs for you to put your fingers through while holding the sandpaper). If you don’t need these tabs, you can skip this step and use a clamp to hold the sandpaper down while you’re sanding.

3. Using a permanent marker, number each piece of sandpaper from 1-5 so that when you’re done with one side, flip it over and work on the other side.

Applying sanding sealer

Sanding sealer is used to prevent any oil or moisture from getting under the finish which would ruin the guitar neck radius block.

The sanding sealer should be applied using a sponge or cloth and then allow it to dry for at least 30 minutes before you apply the varnish.

Apply the varnish over the sanding sealer and let it dry overnight before adding another layer of varnish.

If you plan on painting your guitar neck radius block, then don’t use any type of sealant between coats of paint.

The completed guitar neck radius block will have an even thickness all around, with no peaks or valleys that might cause problems with the guitar’s performance down the line.

How to make a guitar neck radius block FAQS

Can I use sandpaper?

No, it is not recommended to use sandpaper on the neck as you will only be able to sand in one direction. You can, however, use a coarse metal file if you have access to one.

What type of sander should I use?

A belt sander is best for this project but any type of sander will work just as well, so long as it has a uniform speed across its surface and it doesn’t vibrate too much during operation.

What type of wood should I use?

It is important to use wood with a tight grain and no knots that will come loose during sanding process. It’s also important to avoid wood that has been wet or dried out because this can cause warping and other problems during the process. As long as the wood you choose doesn’t contain any cracks, splits, or knots, any kind of hardwood will work for this project.

How can I make sure my radius stays uniform over time?

After each round of sanding, moisten the surface before continuing on with another round of sanding as this will help keep your radius uniform by helping prevent cracking and splitting due to changes in humidity or temperature changes over time.

Conclusion

A guitar neck radius block is a template for cutting the curved edge of a fretboard. When the fretboard is installed, the radius block provides a guide for the router. It ensures a uniform amount of curve on the fretboard. In this article, we’ll tell you how to make one.

You’ll need a solid piece of wood, a table saw, a miter saw, a jigsaw, a router with a flush trim bit, a belt sander and some sandpaper.

The first step is to measure and cut a 3/4″ thick board to 26″ long and 12″ wide. We recommend using a solid piece of wood that’s free of knots or major defects. You’ll then need to mark the center point on both ends and use your table saw or miter saw to cut off the corners so you have a rectangle with flat edges.

Next, use your jigsaw to cut out the curved edges, making sure to use extra caution when working around the edges. After cutting both ends, use your belt sander to round the edges and then use your router and flush trim bit to smooth and finish off the ends.