How to paint an unfinished guitar body

How to paint an unfinished guitar body

A guitar body is the frame that holds the strings and pickups, just like a body of a car. It comes in many shapes and styles, but some are easier to paint than others. The neck supports the guitar body from below and its shape is important for playing comfort. A bolt-on neck is anatomically shaped for fast action, which makes it easier to install after painting your unfinished guitar body. If you’re looking for a more traditional-looking guitar, you may want to choose a set-in neck style instead of a bolt-on neck.

If you’re interested in learning how to paint an unfinished guitar body, read on!

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What is a guitar body?

A guitar body is the frame that holds the strings and pickups, just like a body of a car. It comes in many shapes and styles, but some are easier to paint than others. The neck supports the guitar body from below and its shape is important for playing comfort. A bolt-on neck is anatomically shaped for fast action, which makes it easier to install after painting your unfinished guitar body. If you’re looking for a more traditional-looking guitar, you may want to choose a set-in neck style instead of a bolt-on neck.

Common guitar body types

There are several common types of guitar bodies, and each has its own strengths and weaknesses.

The classical guitar body is an interesting shape. It’s a narrow rectangle with rounded corners. The top has a slight curve to it, which aids in the installation of strings.

A dreadnought guitar body is the most common type of body used for guitars. It’s a simple rectangular box that is wider than it is tall. It can be set-in or bolt-on neck style.

The Association of Stringed Instrument Manufacturers (ASIM) Standard Guitar Body is a variation on the Dreadnought shape but with a bit more curvature to the top and bottom edges. This shape gives more “room” for the sound waves to resonate, which can impact tone quality in some cases.

Though there are many different types of guitar bodies, each type has its own benefits and downsides for painting an unfinished guitar body. If you’re interested in learning how to paint a guitar body, keep on reading!

How to paint an unfinished guitar body

The first step in how to paint an unfinished guitar body is to remove the strings, pickups and bridge on your guitar. Next, you’ll want to sand down any rough edges or bumps on your guitar body. After you’ve sanded it down, wipe off any dust with a clean cloth. The next step is to prime your guitar body with a primer that matches the paint of your choice. It’s always easier to cover up more than one color with a new coat of paint; this helps when painting an unfinished guitar body.

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Now, you’re ready for the fun part! Paint your desired design onto your finished guitar body and let it dry overnight. You can use a clear coat to finish off the top of your new masterpiece or leave it as is! When you’re finished painting an unfinished guitar body, you may want to consider adding some kind of pickguard for protection against nicks and scratches during transport and storage.

Painting a bolt-on neck

If you’re painting a bolt-on neck guitar, start with the body. It is important to sand the body completely before painting it. Once the body is sanded and clean, use an adhesive like Elmer’s glue or tacky wax to lightly coat its surface. This will help seal any gaps that may open up during painting and also act as a primer for the paint job. Allow it to dry for about 24 hours before moving on to priming.

To paint a bolt-on neck guitar body, use an airbrush with acrylic paint and a paintbrush with oil paints. To prepare your airbrush, put in your desired color and make sure there are no clogs in the nozzle by blowing through it while pressing down on the valve button. Next, prime your airbrush by spraying a line of acrylic paint until it runs out of color or until you become sick of priming it (whichever comes first). You should do this 2-3 times until you find your desired coverage level or you can use an artist’s brush instead if you want even more control over how much paint is being used to cover the surface. Go ahead and start painting! Use some oil paints if needed but do not let them dry as they are difficult to remove once they have dried. Outline areas where there are seams between panels and creases before painting them in order for there not to be any white marks afterwards when doing shading work later on.

Choose your paint colors and brushes

The first thing you’ll need is to choose your paint colors. We recommend using a few different shades of the same color, like a light and dark blue, or a light and dark green. You can also use complimentary colors to create contrast, like red and green. Make sure the paint is prepped by stirring with a wood stir stick or brush until it’s mixed well.

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Preparing the surface for painting

Before you can paint your guitar body, you will need to prepare the surface. You’ll want to sand it down so that it’s smooth and free from any imperfections. After that, make sure the wood is dry before you apply the primer or any other coatings of paint.

Painting the neck

One of the most important parts of a guitar body is the neck. The neck supports the guitar body from below and its shape is important for playing comfort. A bolt-on neck is anatomically shaped for fast action, which makes it easier to install after painting your unfinished guitar body. If you’re looking for a more traditional-looking guitar, you may want to choose a set-in neck style instead of a bolt-on neck.

To paint your unfinished guitar body’s bolt-on neck:

Step 1) Remove any particles or dust from the surface using a vacuum cleaner or tack cloth.

Step 2) Apply primer to the bare wood with an even coat. Allow it to dry before moving forward.

Step 3) Mask off the unfinished side of your bolt on neck so that paint does not get on this surface.

Step 4) Paint over the front, painted side of your bolt on neck with two coats, allowing each coat to dry completely in between applications.

Painting a set-in neck

If you’re looking for a more traditional-time guitar with a set-in neck, here’s what you’ll need:

– Fiberglass resin and hardener

– Paint brush or sponge

– Acrylic paint

– Paper to catch drips

– Clear gloss finish spray paint

– Vinyl cloth or paper to protect surrounding surfaces

Preparing your wood for painting

Once you have your guitar body, it’s time to prep the wood for painting. After stripping the old finish off your guitar body, sand it with 200-grit paper. When sanding, make sure not to press down too hard or you’ll leave deep scratches in the wood. Choose a light color for your paint job that will show up well on your finished guitar.

 Eventually, you’ll want to re-finish your guitar with polyurethane or lacquer for protection, but before that you’re going to need to prime it and use an oil-based primer if it’s made of mahogany. This is because mahogany has a tendency to bleed through latex paints, which can leave unsightly marks all over your work. Use a water-based primer on guitars made of maple or other woods and then seal with lacquer or polyurethane if the paint job is not clear coated.

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Painting the body of the guitar

You can choose to paint the entire guitar, or just part of it. Depending on what type of design you want, you’ll need to decide which parts to paint.

The body of the guitar is usually made from wood, so seal the wood before painting. Use one coat of primer and then follow with a few coats of paint. Make sure that your hands are nice and dry before applying any paint.

If desired, you can apply a clear coat to protect your artwork or use a color-matched spray varnish instead of multiple coats of gloss.

How to paint an unfinished guitar body FAQS

What is a guitar body?

The guitar body is the frame that holds the strings and pickups, just like a body of a car. It has many shapes, but some are easier to paint than others. The neck supports it from below and its shape is important for playing comfort. A bolt-on neck is anatomically shaped for fast action, which makes it easier to install after painting your unfinished guitar body. If you’re looking for a more traditional-looking guitar, you may want to choose a set-in neck style instead of the bolt-on neck.

What does the neck of a guitar do?

The neck supports the body of the instrument and also helps with playing comfort.

How do I know what kind of neck my guitar has?

Your guitar will have either a bolt-on or set-in neck depending on its shape.
A bolt-on neck is anatomically shaped for fast action, which makes it easier to install after painting your unfinished guitar body; if you’re looking for more of a tradition style, then go with a set in neck style instead.

Conclusion

A guitar body is the part of the guitar that makes up the large, flat surface that you strum. There are three types of body construction: bolt-on neck, set-in neck and neck through. A bolt-on neck is attached to a guitar’s neck with screws and allows for greater access for arm movement. A set-in neck is attached with glue and allows for greater sustain. A neck-through construction attaches the guitar’s neck through the body and offers greater stability.

Regardless of what type of guitar body you have, painting an unfinished guitar body can be a bit tricky. Remember to choose your paint colors and brushes carefully, prepare the surface properly before painting, and paint in a well-ventilated area.